How Do Rigging And Dogging Differ

rigging course

Traditionally, the name “rigger” refers to someone who knows how to manage the pulleys and related equipment. Their responsibilities have become much broader in recent years. All methods of mechanical weight shifting, such as moving, positioning, securing, and setting up equipment are included in the definition of rigging.

The primary responsibility of a rigger is to ensure the safe movement of plant and equipment on a construction site. The equipment comes in two distinct types: static and mobile items. The popular choices include erections, nets and even safety lines. The precast concrete helps in keeping all the panels in their right places.

It is extremely important to get the proper rigging course as this assist in performing all tasks in a secure and effortless way. Once a rigger is professionally trained, they can dismantle all installations safely.

Various levels of rigging training should be completed before beginning this type of work to ensure the safety of all parties involved.

As a rigger, you must also possess dogger skills, so obtaining your dogging licence is an essential component of the training process for becoming a rigger.

What exactly is dogging?

When it comes to building sites, dogging course can be used to perform a variety of tasks. An experienced dogger is knowledgeable in the proper use of slinging techniques to properly transport a weight.

A dogman or dogger is a person who has received adequate training in the art of dogging course, and they play a significant part in a variety of industries, including construction, demolition, heavy vehicle industries, shipping, and freight.

A dogger is the primary person responsible for the proper selection and inspection of lifting equipment to properly sling a load, which means they bear a significant amount of responsibility on the job site. Loads that are not properly secured can pose a significant safety concern, which is why the dogger must be professionally trained and licenced to do their duties.

Doggers are also trained in guiding plant operators to transport cargo throughout a facility in a safe and efficient manner. In addition to tying down and slinging goods, the dogger assists crane, telehandler, and excavator operators in moving their loads safely when visibility is limited for the driver.

The dogger is trained to use specific hand signals to share the message with the plant operator. The other communication signals can be the whistles or the radio links. Hence, it becomes extremely easy to place all the loads safely and securely when needed preventing all accidents.